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Our Work

MWG is focused on the below four projects in the USA and Africa:

USA Project - 01

Real Estate and Housing Stability

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Inflation is compounding the problem. Rent has increased at its fastest rate since 1986, putting houses and apartments out of reach for more Americans. Ultimately, this leads to homelessness. 

 

Homelessness is a supply and demand problem, since not everyone has a place to live. Homes cost more as people compete for limited supply. Thus, more people are priced out, and more end up homeless. There are also policy failures, instituting laws and zoning rules that limit the number of available homes. 

Down Payment assistance

 

Home prices have declined and incomes have dropped, despite inflation—an acute problem for Black and Hispanic communities and first-time homebuyers. MWG supports Black and Hispanic families with a down-payment assistance program to build wealth. 

Homeownership is an important part of the “American dream” and helps families build wealth. The value of homeownership includes control over one’s own space, stable monthly payments, tax incentives and improved credit scores. Home equity accounts for 60% of the total wealth among America’s middle class. Eliminating racial disparities in homeownership rates and home equity gains would shrink the racial wealth gap by 31% and 16%, respectively, according to a recent analysis by Demos.

 

Homelessness and affordable housing

 

America’s homeless crisis is worsening. Shelters across the U.S. are reporting a surge in people looking for help, with waitlists doubling or tripling in recent months. Some live in encampments, which have popped up in parks and other public spaces in major cities from Washington, D.C., to Seattle since the pandemic began.

USA Project - 02

Domestic Violence: Bernice Women

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“Empowering women economically and personally in the changing world of work in the fight against domestic and gender-based violence...” – Bernice Women.

Bernice Women started in 2015 as a social support group of career women who had been experiencing violence. Bernice means “victorious,” which is a fitting name for such women. The group grew to 50 women by the end of 2016.

Bernice Women‘s strategy is to empower women to take charge of economic sustainability and personal development to end violence. The group has led campaigns against domestic, sexual and gender-based violence in homes, workplaces and society. BERNICE WOMEN Social support group organizes expos to give more knowledge to career women under the themes such as “SUPERWOMAN” for economic, sustainable and personal development. Bernice Women is privileged to celebrate women and uplift victims and survivors. To end violence, we organize EXPOs, since one of the biggest causes of violence in homes and workplaces is finances, disease etc...To learn and partner with health bodies, Trade, Educationalists, Nutritionists, Health and fitness, economic and financial empowerment etc... It will create awareness, end stigma and shame around women and the public who struggle to learn about their economic situations, among others.

USA Project - 03

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MWG provides mentorship services to Black and Hispanic Youth. MWG has been working with African communities in California to provide a sense of belonging for today's youth. MWG is committed to working with religious organizations including churches, Islamic organizations, social services organizations, other youth NGOs to provide mentorship and leadership in career paths, letters of recommendations, college applicant process, job application process, life events and refer/sponsor candidates to professional Counseling Services that include mental health experts when needed. 

 

MWG teams up youth with mentors in their specific career paths, with similar interests, and the same gender. MWG encourages mentors to use phone conversations, Zoom or Google meetings, or lunch public meetings to direct and mentor Black and Hispanic youth. MWG will work with other mentorship organizations to refer these youth to needed services if they are not available in-house. 

 

MWG encourages other organizations that offer mentorship services to partner with MWG. Please contact MWG at minoritywealthgap@gmail.com or call 1-818-770-9814.

USA Project - 04

Mental Health awareness

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Mental health illness does not discriminate by race, color, gender, or sexual orientation. Racial and ethnic minorities often suffer from poor mental health outcomes due to the cultural stigma and lack of mental health care services in minority communities. All of us must address these issues.  Together, we can realize our shared vision of a nation where those affected by mental illness—no matter their background, culture, ethnicity or identity—can get appropriate support and quality care to live healthy, fulfilling lives.

 

MWG partners with mental health experts and sponsors to increase access to mental health professional services. We do this because we cannot separate mental/physical support from wealth. Good health is wealth.

 

Black, indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) have rich histories. Despite oppression, persecution, and abuse, immeasurable strength exists in each of these cultures. BIPOC communities are significantly more likely to develop mental health conditions, yet accessibility and education regarding mental health remains lacking.

 

The Black and African American populations are sicker compared to other populations. Health inequalities result from reduced access to healthcare and lower quality of care. Most African Americans avoid seeking services until they are in dire need because of fear of culturally incompetent doctors. Racial and ethnic minorities are:

  • Less likely to get the preventive care needed to stay healthy.

  • More likely to suffer from serious illness, such as diabetes or heart disease.

  • Less likely to have access to quality healthcare when they do get sick.

 

MWG will address health through fitness activities like sports, hiking, walkathons, yoga bookings, community youth sporting events, dance classes and bootcamps.

 

Single and or Pregnant Black and Hispanic Mothers Support

 

Americans in their 20s, 30s, and even 40s are poorer today than young adults were three decades ago. For Millennials, median wealth in 2016 was lower than the wealth of any similarly aged cohort between 1989 and 2007. Many Millennials have the bad fortune of graduating into an economy weakened by the financial crisis of 2007–2009 and the Great Recession that followed.  Many companies have not expanded or raised wages much, creating fewer opportunities early in people’s careers. Millennials are also more racially diverse than earlier generations. People of color, especially Black Americans, have historically accumulated wealth less rapidly due to intentional discrimination from the government that kept Black families from receiving subsidized mortgages, owning homes and passing down wealth to later generations.

 

Single Black and Hispanic mothers have less wealth. Black women with some collegiate education make less than white women with only high school degrees. Black women must earn advanced degrees before they earn more than white women with only bachelor’s degrees and the median wealth of single white women being $42,000 compared to $100 for single black women. Native women and Black women experience poverty at a higher rate than any other race-gender group. Black and Latinx women still earn the least, while White and Asian men earn the most. Black women are three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than White women.

 

MWG foundation supports Black and Hispanic mothers with monetary support, wellness access, counseling, access to childcare, mental health and a focus on health and fitness. Single black and Hispanic mothers are the backbone of American households and are in charge of raising the next generation.

More Sources of Information

 

Africa Project 01

School and Farming 

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In Uganda, 41% of people live in poverty, and almost half of Uganda’s population is under the age of 15, representing one of the youngest populations in the world.

Most people in Uganda live below the poverty line and face many problems, including food and shelter, inadequate health care, unsafe drinking water, poor education and unemployment.

 

The struggle of the poor starts in the womb. The child in the womb suffers from the consequences of malnutrition in the mother. Families living in such a state are daily wage laborers. They are unable to fetch their square meal a day. Some parents admit their children to school but cannot continue taking them to school because they cannot pay the fees for school. That's the reason the children are school dropouts. Despite planned development and special provision for the accelerated socio-economic development of neglected/disadvantaged sections, the issue of orphan and underprivileged children is not adequately addressed. Therefore, we envisage mainstreaming poor children in the national building by providing care, support and protection in our children’s homes. Poverty has consistently been recognized as the primary cause of disease, death, and disability. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently stated that poverty is the “ruthless killer.” We want to change that.

The project aims to address their shelter, food, education, and health development:

1. To provide an opportunity for orphans and poor children to live in a friendly atmosphere with parental love to pursue their education.

2. To provide food, shelter, education and clothing for orphans and needy children.

3. To provide medical care for the children living in the home.

4. To impart moral values to children to strengthen them to become self-reliant in the home.

5. To provide a quality of life that enables residents to retain their independence, identity and sense of value.

6. To liberate rural women from economic bondage/dependency and poverty and from marginalization to liberate them economically.

Africa Project 02

Bernice Women Africa

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“Empowering women economically and personally in the changing world of work in the fight against domestic and gender-based violence...” – Bernice Women.

Bernice Women started in 2015 as a social support group of career women who had been experiencing violence. Bernice means “victorious,” which is a fitting name for such women. The group grew to 50 women by the end of 2016.

Bernice Women‘s strategy is to empower women to take charge of economic sustainability and personal development to end violence. The group has led campaigns against domestic, sexual and gender-based violence in homes, workplaces and society.

BERNICE WOMEN Social support group organizes expos to give more knowledge to career women under the themes such as “SUPERWOMAN” for economic, sustainable and personal development. Bernice Women is privileged to celebrate women and uplift victims and survivors. To end violence, we organize EXPOs, since one of the biggest causes of violence in homes and workplaces is finances, disease etc...To learn and partner with health bodies, Trade, Educationalists, Nutritionists, Health and fitness, economic and financial empowerment etc... It will create awareness, end stigma and shame around women and the public who struggle to learn about their economic situations, among others.

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